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新SAT阅读真题解析与答案

2018/10/3103:35来源:互联网  

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  SAT改革之后阅读部分发生了变化,新SAT阅读考试想要拿高分,不练练题怎么行?小编今天分享的是SAT阅读真题解析与答案

 

  Exercise 1

  This passage is excerpted from Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, originally published in 1803.

  Mrs. Allen was so long in dressing that they did not enter the ballroom till late. As for Mr. Allen, he repaired directly to the card-room. With more care for the safety of her new gown than for the comfort of her protegee, Mrs. Allen made her way through the throng of men by the door, as swiftly as the necessary caution would allow; Catherine, however, kept close at her side, and linked her arm too firmly within her friend's to be torn asunder by any common effort of a struggling assembly. Still they moved on—something better was yet in view; and by a continued exertion of strength and ingenuity they found themselves at last in the passage behind the highest bench. It was a splendid sight, and she began, for the first time that evening, to feel herself at a ball: she longed to dance, but she had not an acquaintance in the room.

 

  Catherine began to feel something of disappointment—she was tired of being continually pressed against by people, the generality of whose faces possessed nothing to interest, and with all of whom she was so wholly unacquainted that she could not relieve the irksomeness of imprisonment by the exchange of a syllable with any of her fellow captives. They saw nothing of Mr. Allen; and after looking about them in vain for a more eligible situation, were obliged to sit down at the end of a table, at which a large party were already placed, without having anything to do there, or anybody to speak to, except each other.

 

  Mrs. Allen congratulated herself, as soon as they were seated, on having preserved her gown from injury. "It would have been very shocking to have it torn," said she, "would not it? It is such a delicate muslin. For my part I have not seen anything I like so well in the whole room, I assure you.""How uncomfortable it is," whispered Catherine, "not to have a single acquaintance here!"

 

  "Yes, my dear," replied Mrs. Allen, with perfect serenity, "it is very uncomfortable indeed."

  "What shall we do? The gentlemen and ladies at this table look as if they wondered why we came here—we seem forcing ourselves into their party."

  "Aye, so we do. That is very disagreeable. I wish we had a large acquaintance here."

  "I wish we had any—it would be somebody to go to."

  "Very true, my dear; and if we knew anybody we would join them directly. The Skinners were here last year—I wish they were here now."

  "Had not we better go away as it is? Here are no tea-things for us, you see."

  "No more there are, indeed. How very provoking! But I think we had better sit still, for one gets so tumbled in such a crowd! How is my head, my dear? Somebody gave me a push that has hurt it, I am afraid."

  "No, indeed, it looks very nice. But, dear Mrs. Allen, are you sure there is nobody you know in all this multitude of people? I think you must know somebody."

  "I don't, upon my word—I wish I did. I wish I had a large acquaintance here with all my heart, and then I should get you a partner. I should be so glad to have you dance. There goes a strange-looking woman! What an odd gown she has got on! How old-fashioned it is! Look at the back."

  After some time they received an offer of tea from one of their neighbours; it was thankfully accepted, and this introduced a light conversation with the gentleman who offered it, which was the only time that anybody spoke to them during the evening, till they were discovered and joined by Mr. Allen when the dance was over.

  "Well, Miss Morland," said he, directly, "I hope you have had an agreeable ball."

  "Very agreeable indeed," she replied, vainly endeavouring to hide a great yawn.

  "I wish she had been able to dance," said his wife; "I wish we could have got a partner for her. I have been saying how glad I should be if the Skinners were here this winter instead of last; or if the Parrys had come, as they talked of once, she might have danced with George Parry. I am so sorry she has not had a partner!"

 

  "We shall do better another evening I hope," was Mr. Allen's consolation.

  The main purpose of the first paragraph is to

  A establish the distant relationship between Mr. and Mrs. Allen.

  B show how claustrophobic and crowded the ballroom is.

  C describe the main characters' belated arrival at the ball.

  D introduce the friendship between Catherine and Mrs. Allen.

 

  QUESTION 2 OF 11

  The narrator implies that Catherine

  A did not have an enjoyable time at the ball.

  B would rather not have to dance with anyone.

  C had a fine time at the ball in spite of herself.

  D does not like keeping the company of Mrs. Allen.

 

  QUESTION 3 OF 11

  Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

  A lines 3–9 (“With . . . assembly”)(“With more care for the safety of her new gown than for the comfort of her protegee, Mrs. Allen made her way through the throng of men by the door, as swiftly as the necessary caution would allow; Catherine, however, kept close at her side, and linked her arm too firmly within her friend's to be torn asunder by any common effort of a struggling assembly.”)

  B lines 12–14 (“It . . . room”)(“It was a splendid sight, and she began, for the first time that evening, to feel herself at a ball: she longed to dance, but she had not an acquaintance in the room.”)

  C lines 15–20 (“Catherine . . . captives”)(“Catherine began to feel something of disappointment—she was tired of being continually pressed against by people, the generality of whose faces possessed nothing to interest, and with all of whom she was so wholly unacquainted that she could not relieve the irksomeness of imprisonment by the exchange of a syllable with any of her fellow captives.”)

  D lines 20–25 (“They . . . other”)(“They saw nothing of Mr. Allen; and after looking about them in vain for a more eligible situation, were obliged to sit down at the end of a table, at which a large party were already placed, without having anything to do there, or anybody to speak to, except each other.”)

 

       QUESTION 4 OF 11

  In line 11 (“ingenuity”), “ingenuity” most nearly means

  A brilliance.

  B dexterity. C inventiveness.

  D intellect.

 

  QUESTION 5 OF 11

  The description of Mrs. Allen in lines 26–30 (“Mrs. Allen congratulated herself, as soon as they were seated, on having preserved her gown from injury. "It would have been very shocking to have it torn," said she, "would not it? It is such a delicate muslin. For my part I have not seen anything I like so well in the whole room, I assure you.””) primarily serves to A illustrate her unruffled personality. B highlight her scrupulousness. C show her expensive tastes.

  D establish her sense of vanity.

 

  QUESTION 6 OF 11

  According to the passage, Catherine is “uncomfortable” because

  A it is too noisy, crowded, and warm.

  B they do not know anyone at the ball.

  C they have arrived at the ball very late.

  D their dresses are at risk of being torn.

 

  QUESTION 7 OF 11

  Which statement best characterizes the relationship between Mrs. Allen and Catherine?

  A Catherine is irritated by Mrs. Allen but defers to her in conversation

  B Catherine is amused by Mrs. Allen but is frustrated by her lack of social connections

  C Catherine is impressed by Mrs. Allen and is interested in her social contacts

  D Catherine is angered by Mrs. Allen and believes her social tactics are ineffective

 

  QUESTION 8 OF 11

  Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

  A lines 31–34 (“How . . . indeed”)(“"How uncomfortable it is," whispered Catherine, "not to have a single acquaintance here!"”)

  B lines 35–39 (“What . . . here”)(“"What shall we do? The gentlemen and ladies at this table look as if they wondered why we came here—we seem forcing ourselves into their party."”)

  C lines 40–43 (“I . . . now”)(“"I wish we had any—it would be somebody to go to."”)

  D lines 50–52 (“But . . . somebody”)(“But, dear Mrs. Allen, are you sure there is nobody you know in all this multitude of people? I think you must know somebody."”)

 

  QUESTION 9 OF 11

  As used in line 65 (“agreeable”) , “agreeable” most nearly means

  A enjoyable.

  B acceptable.

  C tolerable.

  D common.

 

  QUESTION 10 OF 11

  Mrs. Allen’s response in lines 53–55 (“I . . . dance”)(“"I don't, upon my word—I wish I did. I wish I had a large acquaintance here with all my heart, and then I should get you a partner. I should be so glad to have you dance.”)mainly serves to A show how shunned they are in the midst of the ball.

  B highlight her attempts to expand her social circle.

  C emphasize the goal of finding Catherine a partner.

  D demonstrate their inability to mingle with new acquaintances.

 

  QUESTION 11 OF 11

  The conversation between Mr. Allen and Catherine in lines 64–67 (“Well . . . yawn”) (“"Well, Miss Morland," said he, directly, "I hope you have had an agreeable ball."”)reveals that Catherine is

  A only being polite to Mr. Allen to conceal her real feelings.

  B incredibly tired and therefore not paying attention to Mr. Allen.

  C extremely bored and doesn’t care if Mr. Allen notices it.

  D offended by Mr. Allen’s question and answers sarcastically.

 

  参考答案:CACBDBABACA

 

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